Master of Divinity

For Admission

Admission
Starts: 29 August, 2016
Duration : 3-3.5 Years
Instructors: Master of Divinity
Phone : 213-736-6500
Fax: 213-736-6504
Email : Admissions@ReformedUniversity.org

General Description and Program Goals

The Reformed University offers Master of Divinity based on 84 semester hours of credit. The objective for this program is to offer rigorous course work and professional training for Pastoral Ministry. Students will take core courses in biblical, historical and concentration studies which will be characterized in this graduate program. Through this program, the students will gain 1) ability to preach and teach the meaning of scripture 2) styles of historic and modern Christian liturgies 3)skills to construct and lead a congregation. The program’s mission is to prepare students to become an influential leaders in ministry, strengthening spiritual maturity, utilizing and explore their gifts and callings; and precede in evangelism- concern for non-Christians around the community and worldwide.

Learning Outcomes


Upon completing the Master of Divinity, students will be able to:

  • Understand the teachings and emphases of each book of the Bible (critical thinking and interpretation);
  • Develop fundamental knowledge in the area of Bible, language, ethics and practicum training
  • Practice Christian faith and reflect theologically by demonstrating spiritual formation, leadership and pastoral care/love
  • Demonstrate the ability to impact the community in Christ through evangelism and social concern with cultural sensitivity
  • Earn the recognized theology degree for ordination

Graduation Requirements

To graduate from the Master of Divinity programs, the student is required to complete a minimum of 84 semester credits which are included in 45 semester credits of biblical studies, 9 semester credits of historical studies, 21 semester credits of concentration areas and 9 semester credits of required courses. At least 30% of the course work must be completed at The Reformed University and the student should have a GPA of 3.0 or above.

To complete the program, a major research paper or a thesis project must be submitted and approved by the faculty advisor. The student will write on a topic which the student is interested and desires to further develop. The student will complete the project during the final year of the program and submit a prospectus and outline for faculty advisor’s approval a semester prior to due date. The length of the project will be approximately 20-30 pages of text, double-spaced in APA format.

 

1. Biblical and Theological Studies: 45 Semester Units

Students will select fifteen courses from the following :

Code Title Unit
BT501 Pentateuch 3 Units
BT502 Pauline Literature 3 Units
BT503 Prophetic Literature 3 Units
BT504 Acts of the Apostles I 3 Units
BT505 Hermeneutics 3 Units
BT506 Preaching 3 Units
BT507 Systematic Theology II 3 Units
BT508 Spiritual Formation 3 Units
BT509 Apologetics 3 Units
BT510 Christian Doctrine 3 Units
BT511 Theological Writing and Research Method 3 Units
BT512 Old Testament Survey II 3 Units
BT513 New Testament Survey II 3 Units
BT514 Use of Scripture in Theology 3 Units
BT515       The Use of Old Testament in New Testament 3 Units   
BT516 Feminist Theories and Theologizing 3 Units
BT517 Globalization Missions, Theology, and Ethics 3 Units
BT518 Theological Foundation for Youth Ministry 3 Units
BT519 Narrative and Theology in the Bible 3 Units
CP599 Chapel II 3 Units

2. Historical Studies: 9 Semester Units

Following courses are required for all M. Div students:

Code Title Unit
HI501 Early Christianity 3 Units
HI502 Western Church History 3 Units
HI503 Korean Church History 3 Units

3. Concentration Areas: 21 Semester Units

Students will select seven courses from the following;

Code Title Unit
MD501 Christian Ethics II 3 Units
MD502     Pastoral Counseling 3 Units       
MD503 Missions II 3 Units
MD504 A-B Hebrew/Greek Tools for Biblical Interpretation 3 Units
MD505 Strategies in World Evangelism 3 Units
MD506 Church & Worldview Relations 3 Units
MD507 Bible Exegesis 3 Units
MD508 Expository Preaching 3 Units
MD509 Administration and Finance for Congregations 3 Units
MD510 Preaching Lab 3 Units
MD511 Spirituality of Healing 3 Units
MD512 Social Issues and the Church in an Urban Context 3 Units
OT510 Mentoring I 6 Units
OT520 Mentoring II 6 Units
OT530 Mentoring III 6 Units

4. Required Courses : 9 Semester Units

These courses are required for all M. Div students:

Code Title Unit
OT599  Graduation Preparation &  Thesis 3 Units       
MT521 Theological Writing and Research Methods 3 Units
MT522 Field Education and Ministry Report II 3 Units

Course Descriptions

 BT501 Pentateuch

This course is designed to provide the student with a broad introduction to the history of salvation as expressed in the Pentateuch. It explores the content, major themes and theology of the Pentateuch with special attention to the relationship of the Pentateuch to Jesus Christ. Our interaction with the Pentateuch is intended not only to increase the student’s knowledge, but also encourage spiritual growth and skill in using the Pentateuch in one’s personal life and ministry. Students will work our way systematically through the Pentateuch, following the narrative from creation to the calling of Abraham to the establishment of the nation of Israel to the Plains of Moab where the nation of Israel readies itself for the conquest of Canaan under the leadership of Joshua.

BT502  Pauline Literature

This course is an exposition of Acts and the Pauline epistles (Romans through Philemon) and a study of the ministry and teachings of the Apostle Paul as recorded in the Pauline Epistles. The life setting of each letter is related to Paul’s journeys described in the book of Acts. Special attention is given to the major theological themes of the epistles. Primary consideration will be given to the following texts: First Thessalonians, Galatians, Philippians, Philemon, First and Second Corinthians, and Romans. Themes will be presented from the Duetero-Pauline Letters, the Pastorals, and the letter to the Hebrews. Attention will also be given to the historical setting and overall message of each book.

BT503  Prophetic Literature

This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in Israel. It explores its origins and surveys some early “non-writing” prophets, and the classical prophets who have left us books which bear their names. These prophets are set in their historical contexts, which include social, political and economic factors; their books and sayings are studied with modern literary techniques, including exegesis of selected texts. The overall aim is to uncover the theological message of the prophets (including their teaching on social justice) and to arrive at an understanding of the development of prophecy into eschatology and apocalyptic.

BT504  Acts of the Apostles I

This course is a survey of the Gospels and Acts with more intensive study of selected texts and issues.  In this course, students complete an exegetical study of the book of Acts by focusing on the biblical theology of the book, the historical background of events, and the theological emphasis of the speeches. In addition, Included are a survey of New Testament backgrounds, evaluation of various critical approaches to the life of Christ, consideration of the historical reliability of the Gospels, and a survey of central theological themes in the teaching of Jesus, and the individual Gospels.

BT505  Hermeneutics

This course will focus on the development of a systematic approach to the interpretation of Scripture. While various critical-interpretive systems and strategies will be considered, special attention will be given to the historical-grammatical method. The predominant literary genres of the Bible will be examined and relevant principles of interpretation highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the original, intended meaning of Scripture in its canonical context as the basis upon which to prepare expositions and make appropriate contemporary applications

BT506  Preaching

This course is designed to offer students an understanding of the theology and practice of preaching in pastoral, liturgical settings. Preaching is God’s revealed way of making himself and His saving covenant known to us. It communicates the Bible as no other way of handling it does. It focuses the church as a worshipping, Word-oriented community. Particular attention will be given on the necessity to proclaim the whole counsel of God biblically, doctrinally, practically, and experientially.

BT507  Systematic Theology II

This course is a study of Christology, giving particular emphasis to both the Person and Work of Jesus Christ. This course is designed to give you a concise introduction to the nature, history and methodology of systematic theology. It should also provide a helpful stimulus in understanding the relationship between the practice of one’s faith and the belief context into which that practice fits. The course will attempt to survey the material from an exegetical, biblical-theological, historical, and creedal basis, giving particular attention to points of interest and debate in our own time. And, the course will focus the nature of a theological vision, the inspiration and authority of Scripture, the interpretation of those Scriptures and the nature of the God whom we worship.

BT508  Spiritual Formation

The course explores the processes and goals of spiritual formation in the life of the Christian minister, counselor or leader from a multi-disciplinary viewpoint including personal, biblical, theological, psychological, and historical perspectives. The student is introduced to the historic disciplines and practices of the Christian faith that promote intimacy with God and Christ-likeness in character with the goal of fostering ongoing personal vitality essential to ministry and the ability to facilitate spiritual renewal and consistent discipleship in others.

BT509  Apologetics

The course will seek to formulate the rational basis for believing in Christian theism, with responses to objections and critiques of competing worldviews. Apologetics is the study of how to give reasons for our Christian hope (1 Pet 3:15). The course has three parts: In the first part, students shall ask what Scripture says about human knowledge, particularly the process by which a non-Christian comes to know Christ. The second part will deal with the controversy over how to do apologetics, discussing representatives of different apologetic schools. The third part will discuss issues under debate between Christians and non-Christians.

BT510  Christian Doctrine

This course is designed for students in Systematic Theology field to help identifying foundational doctrines and their spiritual foundations, and gain an understanding of the communal and historic nature of doctrines. This course bases the theological formation of students upon biblical data as well as upon the classical Christian tradition, contemporary theology, and Wesleyan theological distinctive with a view to helping students grasp the importance of theology for the practice of ministry. The course will help students understand and express why disciplined thoughts and faithful confessions are crucial for them.

BT511  Theological Writing and Research Method

This course is a study of the theological research and writing methods to understand the forms and requirements of dissertation and report writing as well as various research methods and resources. The course offers an overview of the different approaches, considerations and challenges involved in academic research. In addition to reviewing core human research methods such as interviews, ethnographies, surveys and experiments, students will explore methods used in critical analysis of texts and technologies, with an emphasis on the digital.

BT512  Old Testament Survey II

This course introduces students to the study of the origins of Christianity by means of the Old Testament. Students will undertake a historical study of the Old Testament documents, seeking to understand their plan, origin, purpose and content within their broader historical and cultural context. Appropriate interpretive method for each genre of the Old Testament will be discussed. Students will also seek to clarify the theological message of each document in light of its historical circumstances.

BT513  New Testament Survey II

This course introduces students to the study of the origins of Christianity by means of the New Testament. Students will undertake a historical study of the New Testament documents, seeking to understand their plan, origin, purpose and content within their broader historical and cultural context. Appropriate interpretive method for each genre of the New Testament will be discussed. Students will also seek to clarify the theological message of each document in light of its historical circumstances, with a view toward understanding their meaning for today.

BT514  Use of Scripture in Theology

A study of the how the New Testament uses the Old Testament. This course will provide an overview of the history of interpretation, a methodology, and the ability to determine how the New Testament writers make use of the Old.

BT515  The Use of Old Testament in New Testament

A study of the how the New Testament uses the Old Testament. This course will provide an overview of the history of interpretation, a methodology, and the ability to determine how the New Testament writers make use of the Old.

BT516  Feminist Theories and Theologizing

This course introduces the student to varieties of feminist and gender theories and theorists, e.g., liberal feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, post-colonial feminism, womanist theorists, and Asian American feminism, in order to provide a theorentical foundation for theologizing on behalf of women. This course fulfills the feminist theory requirement for the Master of Theology student.

BT517  Globalization Missions, Theology, and Ethics

Globalization is an undeniable political, social, economic, and cultural reality. Why and how should we be engaging with its effects? As well as looking at how Christians use and contest global trends, we will explore how the church should be responding-theologically, ethically and practically – to issues such as global warming, economic and trade disparities, migration, poverty, cultural homogenization, and the challenges of co-existence among varied faith communities. The role and responses of those marginalized by global processes will be explored.

BT518 Theological Foundation for Youth Ministry

This course explores the theological foundations of ministry with young people, ranging from those in early to those in late adolescence and emerging adulthood. Primary attention will be given to the role faith plays in adolescent development and identity formation, and to the church’s responsibility to young people in and beyond congregations. This course emphasizes incarnational and missional approaches to the gospel, as well as young people’s own agency as participants in the total mission of the church.

BT519  Narrative and Theology in the Bible

Most of the Bible is “stories”—something happens. Things change. In this course we will analyze some of the most important biblical texts and discuss both their narrative beauty and the theological ideas that come from stories, e.g., Exodus, covenant, vindication, identity, redemption. Texts covered will include Genesis, Exodus, Judges, Kings, Mark, John. In addition, we will consider the novelistic texts that arose between the texts just mentioned, such as Esther, Judith, and Tobit.

CP599 Chapel II

Chapel presentations address the imperatives of the Christian message related to worship, evangelism, discipleship, fellowship, and ministry. Through the course, students will gain an appreciation for the integration of faith, learning, and vocation. Also, students will develop a personal spiritual journey through understand of the Bible and the practice of spiritual disciplines.

HI501  Early Christianity

This class is a survey of the history of Christianity in its first thousand years. Major issues will include Christian origins and its Jewish roots; the diversity of early Christian theologies, including gnosticism and orthodoxy; martyrdom and the rise of monasticism; questions of faith and order; trinitarian and christological controver­sies; and Christianity in Africa and Asia. The course will also focus on the challenges and opportunities facing the church throughout the first millennium, including its encounter with Islam and other faith traditions.

HI502  Western Church History

This course is designed to teach students to the history of religion in the United States. The course will cover American church history from its beginnings in the colonial period to its most recent expressions in the twentieth century. Major movements, leading personalities, theological developments and religious trends will be examined with the aim to better understand the evangelical tradition. Students will study the relationship of religious life to the cultural, social, economic, and political currents of American history, and consider how the history of religion shapes the way students should understand American history as a whole. They will also study the development of religious practices and beliefs in relation to proprietary and corporate capitalism, faith in technological progress, an increasingly pervasive market culture, changing gender conventions, racial and ethnic pluralism, and a political democracy structured, in part, by the separation of church and state.

HI503  Korean Church History 

This course will focus on the history of the Korean church. In this course, the introduction of the Gospel to Korea and its historical background, the sociological and political contexts of the time, the influence of the Gospel on the traditional Korean society, an evaluation of the rapid growth of the Korean church in a relatively short period of time and the future of the Korean church will be explored. In this course, students will examine the biblical and theological principles for church revitalization. Simultaneously, the course will examine biblical paradigms, strategies, church leadership, and practical applications for healthy church growth both in terms of local congregations and leadership.

MD501  Christian Ethics II

The course will explore the moral implications of the Christian commitment, the formulation and development of the principles of Christian ethics for persons and within communities, and their application to areas of contemporary life. Students are introduced to terminology, major views, and problems in the study of ethics and to a biblical basis for morality, and basic concerns and current issues in social ethics are covered. The course teaches the methods and topics of moral reflection and action in the biblical, historical and theological context. The course focuses on new life in Christ as embodied in the church for the world.

MD502  Pastoral Counseling

This class focuses on various counseling skills for effective interaction and learning necessary advanced pastoral counseling techniques. The course topic covers the followings: counseling theories with spiritual and theological principles, spiritual and religious perspectives of counseling, theoretical counseling applications in spiritual settings, and examination of special theories of pastoral counseling. Special emphasis will be on individual counseling and consultation.

MD503  Missions II

This course examines biblical and theological foundations of mission with attention to historical, cultural and methodological issues. The course is designed to introduce the students to the biblical, theological, historical, and practical bases for Christian missions. Students will survey major eras in the history of Christian missions and learn to recognize contemporary “types” of mission strategy that are one legacy of this history. The course will then study the biblical and theological basis of Christian mission and examine continuing issues that church workers confront as they seek to share a message.

MD504A  Hebrew Tools for Biblical Interpretation

This course is study of the elements of Biblical Hebrew with emphasis on vocabulary, syntax and grammar to equip the student to be able to read the Hebrew text. To impart an active knowledge of Standard Biblical Hebrew, so that students will be struck by linguistic anomalies in the Bible and thereby anticipate the questions posed by philologically oriented exegetes like Ibn Ezra, Rashbam, and Radak.

MD504B  Greek Tools for Biblical Interpretation

This course is a study of vocabulary and an analysis of the grammar of New Testament Greek, and the purpose of this course is to learn the fundamentals of Biblical Greek phonology, morphology, and syntax in order to begin reading and translating the Greek New Testament. The course concerns with learning the rudiments of Greek (accidence and some vocabulary) with a goal of using the Greek New Testament in preaching, Bible studies, and exegesis courses in the Greek New Testament.

MD505  Strategies in World Evangelism

This course considers the biblical and historical dimensions of evangelism as well as strategies for developing culturally specific evangelism. The course explores different models for evangelism for today’s world.

MD506  Church & Worldview Relations

This course develops a Christian worldview from a redemptive history model of biblical theology, which is then clarified using the philosophical categories of metaphysics, epistemology, and axiology. The course provides sociological and ethical approaches toward better understanding the social nature and mission of the church. Students will gain an understanding of modern and postmodern thought and how to critique them biblically, and are encouraged to develop and apply a Christian worldview to life and ministry.

MD507 Bible Exegesis

This course is designed to familiarize the student with biblical interpretation. Special emphasis will be placed upon exegesis in light of history, grammar, and theological content. The course will focus on the development of a systematic approach to the interpretation of Scripture. Attentions will be given to various critical-interpretative systems and strategies. This course will instruct in various parameters for biblical interpretation and will show how specific methods are applied to Bible study.

MD508 Expository Preaching

This course is designed to offer students an introductory understanding of the theology and practice of preaching in pastoral, liturgical settings. This course intends to help students and preachers to create Christ-centered sermons which are firmly rooted in the Scriptures. In this course, we will investigate creative languages of proclamation as means for communicating God’s story in the context of worship in ways that both learns from and challenges contemporary media-saturated cultures.

MD509  Administration and Finance for Congregations

This course seeks to foster administrative skills as an essential component of effective ministry for clergy and lay leaders. Specific topics will include compensation strategies, personnel issues, decision-making processes, management styles, budgeting, and financial management in the parish. The course will also cover issues re­lating to the spirituality of money and the vocational dimensions of church administration.

MD510  Preaching Lab

This course is designed for students who would like to gain experience in preaching. Through this class, students will practice in preaching several sermons in front of people. In this course, students shall look at the guiding principles that constitute reformed preaching through the ages, giving particular concentration on the mechanics of sermon construction. Particular attention will be given on the necessity to proclaim the whole counsel of God biblically, doctrinally, practically, and experientially.

MD511  Spirituality of Healing

This course explores the spiritual foundations of healing, including mind and body connections, breaking the cycle of violence, and developing life-affirming spiritual practices. Particular emphasis will be on healing from internalized racism, homophobia, and other forms of structural oppression. There will be opportunities to study Chinese approaches to healing.

MD512  Social Issues and the Church in an Urban Context

This course will examine the new challenges confronting the church in social ministry. Particular emphasis will be placed on institutional responses to the environmental crisis, health care delivery, housing for all peo­ple, and a close examination of the criminal justice system. The premise of the course involves the recognition that the word urban has become a code for race and as such the course will examine racism as a personal and institutional impediment to positively engaging all social issues. We will review previous strategies, evaluate their effectiveness and utility for the twenty-first century, and seek clarity regarding the appropriate roles for the church.

OT510-530  Mentoring I, II, III

Mentoring can change the course of students’ lives when they learn to make thoughtful choices and follow through with commitments. In the process, students realize they can achieve more than they ever dreamed possible. This course provides a roadmap to implement an effective coaching and mentoring program that leads to improved student learning and success. Participants learn to serve as coaches and mentors to students and fellow educators— roles effective both within the classroom and beyond the school at large. They come to appreciate the relationship between mentoring and leadership through the study of historical leadership background, as well as by considering the characteristics of successful mentoring programs. Educators are prepared to engage in transformational leadership.

OT599  Graduation Preparation & Graduation Thesis

This course focuses on methods and techniques of behavioral research with specific focus on methods frequently used in educational and social science research. Potential and completed problems are analyzed with a view to the selection of research topics. The research process is reviewed with the emphasis on design, application, consumption, as well as standards for writing research papers.

MT521  Theological Writing and Research Methods

This course is a study of the theological research and writing methods to understand the forms and requirements of dissertation and report writing as well as various research methods and resources. The course offers an overview of the different approaches, considerations and challenges involved in academic research. In addition to reviewing core human research methods such as interviews, ethnographies, surveys and experiments, students will explore methods used in critical analysis of texts and technologies, with an emphasis on the digital.

MT522  Field Study and Report II

The course helps students gain further hands-on experience and gives them the opportunity to integrate their academic learning with real ministry contexts. The students will have supervised ministry experience in a church and meet regularly with a faculty mentor for the purpose of case study discussion, direction, and peer support in relation to students’ ministry site experiences, personal awareness, academic studies, and spiritual formation. The students are required to write a report about their experience at the end of the course.